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2014 Conference

Maddie's Shelter Medicine Conference: May 18 to 20 in Orlando Thank you for joining us at the 7th Annual Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Conference.  Our presenters have generously provided their notes for you to download and reference.

Click here to watch the presentations from the 2014 Conference

Presentation Notes

Saving Lives through Integrated Medical and Behavioral Programs – Part 1

Saving Lives through Integrated Medical and Behavioral Programs – Part 2

What Kind of Dog is That? 

The Evolution of Adoption Programs – Part 1

The Evolution of Adoption Programs – Part 2  

Infectious Diseases in Large-scale Cat Hoarding Investigations

Cats and Capacity for Care

Treating Heartworm Disease in Shelter Dogs: 500+ Cases (and counting!)

Infectious Diseases of Dogs Rescued in Dogfighting Investigations

B. gibsoni; What Does it Mean for Your Shelter?

Vet to Vet: Ponazuril Protocols  

Vet to Vet: Secnidazole Treatment for Giardiasis

Vet to Vet: Serial FIV Serological Results in Cohabiting FIV-Positive and FIV-Negative Cats

Vet to Vet: Efficacy of Synthetic Feline Interdigital Semiochemical (FIS)


 

Learning Objectives

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Saving Lives through Integrated Medical and Behavioral Programs

Dr. Cynda Crawford and Aimee Sadler

Part I
Sunday, May 18
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a..m.

Part II
Sunday, May 18
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

The medical department’s protocols to prevent transmissible disease and injuries may come into direct conflict with the behavior department’s protocols to socialize, exercise, and train dogs. How do you choose the best approaches to balance medical and behavioral needs? Shelter veterinarians and leading trainers/advocates of behavior programs will address this issue by providing their perspectives and case studies for merging critical medical and behavioral programs in shelters to increase their life-saving capacity.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe how the “Playing for Life!™…training program for shelter dogs enhances quality of life, assessment, and adoption matching for shelter dogs.
  • Review case studies of shelters that implemented new approaches for addressing the emotional and behavioral well-being of the animals and the medical team’s responses.
  • Explore protocols that merge the best of behavior programs and medical care.
  • Identify medical and safety risks important to manage when implementing new behavior programs.
  • Discover the importance of treating the whole animal for best practices in animal sheltering.

 

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The Evolution of Adoption Programs:

Part One: Taking Breed out of the Equation

Dr. Julie Levy and Caitlin Quinn

Sunday, May 18
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Shelter medicine teams have the opportunity to take the lead in utilizing innovative adoption policies to save more lives.  Cutting-edge research reveals that we should focus our efforts on breed-neutral best practices with proven effectiveness to make policy and adoption decisions, rather than relying on breed. Find out how to utilize this new information to revitalize adoption programs, decrease length of stay and increase live outcomes.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to recognize and overcome barriers in order to make better adoption matches, reduce length-of-stay, and change the way decision makers, potential adopters and community members think about dogs
  • Develop breed-neutral policies and procedures to decrease length of stay and increase live release
  • Review the latest research on breed and its relevance to adoption programs
  • Understand the importance of policy on the way adopter’s view dogs and shelters

The Evolution of Adoption Programs:

Part Two: Marketing to Save Lives

Dr. Julie Levy and Caitlin Quinn

Sunday, May 18
4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Innovations in the way we consider marketing adoptions in shelters mean that everyone has the opportunity to put on their PR hat – including medical team members! Once breed-neutral policies are in place, learn how to implement strategies that decrease barriers to adoption and increase live outcomes. Understand how to capitalize on existing programs and materials to promote adoptions and ultimately boost the visibility of your shelter in the community.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn to remove barriers to adoption through innovative marketing techniques, specifically designed for easy implementation  in the shelter environment
  • Understand how programs designed for enrichment and increased quality of life can double as marketing initiatives
  • Review policies and best practices that will help to increase lifesaving and impact community perceptions about adoption

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Infectious Diseases in Large-scale Cat Hoarding Investigations

Dr. Katherine Polak
Monday, May 19
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Animal hoarders often accumulate animals in over-crowded conditions without adequate nutrition, sanitation and veterinary care.  As a result, animals seized from hoarding situations frequently suffer from a variety of medical conditions including enteric and respiratory infections, retroviruses, dermatophytosis, malnutrition, and other evidence of neglect.  This session will explore the results from a retrospective study characterizing the infectious diseases carried by clinically affected cats from four large-scale cat hoarding investigations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify infectious disease prevalence rates in cats from hoarding investigations
  • Learn how to prepare for the mass treatment of infectious disease in a temporary shelter
  • Understand how to develop and implement protocols to prevent transmission of feline or zoonotic infections during the emergency response and when transferring rescued cats to other shelters or to adopters

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CPR in Community Cat TNR Clinics

Dr. Luisito Pablo
Monday, May 19
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

In this session, the techniques and principles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in community cats will be discussed. The practical aspects and limitations of performing CPR in community cats will be emphasized as well.

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Cats and Capacity for Care

Dr. Kate Hurley
Monday, May 19
2:00 p.m. –  3:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m. –  5:30 p.m.

What if there was a magic wand we could wave over animal shelters to increase cat adoptions while cutting daily care costs, reducing stress for staff, creating a more welcoming environment for volunteers and visitors, and dramatically improving the health and welfare of shelter cats? It’s not quite as easy as a magic wand, but Capacity for Care (C4C) can have these benefits and more. In this workshop we will discuss the elements of Capacity for Care in the context of the Five Freedoms and the ASV Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters; describe in detail the steps for calculating required physical and staff capacity for care; and provide a variety of practical, real-life strategies to make sure there is a good match between the actual daily population and the required Capacity for Care. The good news about C4C is that it can apply to any shelter, small or large, rich or poor, open or limited intake. And the even better news is that attaining C4C in the shelter, frees resources to invest in building Capacity for Care in the community as well. We now know that cats, people, wildlife and communities are best served, when we admit cats to shelter in balance with our ability to provide care and assure a live outcome for every healthy cat. C4C will help you get there.

 

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Florida Pharmacy: Laws and Rules Governing the Practice of Veterinary Medicine and Dispensing Legend Drugs

Mr. Edwin Bayo
Monday, May 19
6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

The Laws and Rules Governing the Practice of Veterinary Medicine and Dispensing Legend Drugs is a three-hour oral and visual presentation. Topics include the disciplinary process and guidelines, recordkeeping requirements, appropriate dispensing practices, DEA regulations, permit requirements, and common causes for disciplinary action and how to avoid them.

Finally, attendees will be brought up-to-date on the most recent statutory, regulatory, and case law changes.

Learning Objectives

Attendees should leave the presentation with a firm grasp of the requirements of:

  • Chapter 455, F.S. (the Department of Business and Professional Regulation)
  • Rule 61G18, F.A.C. (the Rules of the Florida Board of Veterinary Medicine)
  • Chapter 474, F.S. (the Florida Veterinary Medicine Practice Act)
  • Chapter 499, F.S. (Drugs, Devices, Cosmetics, and Household Products)
  • Chapter 893, F.S. (the Florida Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act)
  • Federal laws regulating the dispensing of legend drugs.

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Treating Heartworm Disease in Shelter Dogs: 500+ Cases (and counting!)

Dr. Natalie Isaza
Tuesday, May 20
9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

A diagnosis of heartworm infection in shelter dogs at municipal animal control facilities can be devastating, and most animals with this disease are euthanized. Not many animal shelters or rescue groups can afford the expense of heartworm treatment, and if they can, may be unable to hold an animal through the entire treatment protocol.  At the University of Florida, veterinarians and students of the Veterinary Community Outreach Program have developed a successful and affordable treatment plan for these dogs, and have treated over 500 animals with heartworm infection since 2008.  Find out how we do it, and how you can work with local rescue groups in your area to provide treatment for dogs in need.

Learning objectives:

  • Review the heartworm life cycle and discuss treatment protocols developed by the American Heartworm Society
  • Learn about specifics of the heartworm treatments performed on dogs belonging to local rescue groups in Alachua County, Florida
  • Discuss the data collected on over 500 dogs treated for heartworm since 2008 in Alachua County, Florida
  • Discuss outcomes for the treated dogs

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Infectious Diseases of Dogs Rescued in Dogfighting Investigations

Dr. Staci Cannon
Tuesday, May 20
10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

In the past, dogs seized in fighting cases were routinely euthanized; however, now rescue organizations are moving toward assessing the health and behavior of the seized dogs to save as many as possible for adoption into the community.  We will discuss diagnostic tests results from a population of seized pit bulls and recommendations for mass screening and treatment of various infectious diseases.

Learning objectives:

  • Review standard medical health intake protocols including physical examination, vaccination, parasite treatment, and infectious disease diagnostic testing
  • Identify common pathogens infecting dogs rescued in dogfighting investigations
  • Understand the importance of screening and serial monitoring to prevent transmission of infectious diseases during the emergency response and when transferring the rescued dogs to other shelters or to adopters

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B. gibsoni; What Does it Mean for Your Shelter?

Dr. Sarah Kirk
Tuesday, May 20
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Babesia gibsoni is an intracellular parasite of red blood cells.  This presentation provides a case study in the diagnosis and management of B.gibsoni in Pit bulls rescued from large-scale fighting rings.  As a shelter veterinarian, you may encounter Babesia in your canine population; how should you respond?

Learning objectives:

  •  Identify which dogs should be suspected of harboring, and therefore be tested for, B. gibsoni.
  • Learn about the treatment protocol used in the ASPCA emergency shelters, its “success rate” and side-effects.
  • Learn how infected dogs should be handled with regard to co-housing, play groups, and adoption into a household with resident dogs.
  • Learn about treatment “failures” and possible next steps for these patients.

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Vet to Vet:
Real-World Solutions and Best Practices to Save More Pets

Dr. Cynda Crawford, Dr. Katherine Polak, Dr. Annette Litster and Dr. Staci Cannon
Tuesday, May 20
4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

From the year’s most important clinical breakthroughs to cutting-edge innovations poised to burst on the scene, veterinarians from Maddie’s Shelter Medicine program have combed through thousands of scientific publications to find the top sources of evidence-based information. From myth-busting to new pearls, attendees will return home with the latest information that will be immediately useful in shelter practice.

Get ready to:

  • Mine the emerging veterinary and scientific literature for answers to tough questions about shelter practice
  • Set up electronic content alerts for interesting topics and journals
  • Use emerging information to develop improved shelter practices
  • Implement cost and time saving tips developed by colleagues in shelter practice

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